Cache Tiering

A cache tier provides Ceph Clients with better I/O performance for a subset of the data stored in a backing storage tier. Cache tiering involves creating a pool of relatively fast/expensive storage devices (e.g., solid state drives) configured to act as a cache tier, and a backing pool of either erasure-coded or relatively slower/cheaper devices configured to act as an economical storage tier. The Ceph objecter handles where to place the objects and the tiering agent determines when to flush objects from the cache to the backing storage tier. So the cache tier and the backing storage tier are completely transparent to Ceph clients.

The cache tiering agent handles the migration of data between the cache tier and the backing storage tier automatically. However, admins have the ability to configure how this migration takes place. There are two main scenarios:

  • Writeback Mode: When admins configure tiers with writeback mode, Ceph clients write data to the cache tier and receive an ACK from the cache tier. In time, the data written to the cache tier migrates to the storage tier and gets flushed from the cache tier. Conceptually, the cache tier is overlaid “in front” of the backing storage tier. When a Ceph client needs data that resides in the storage tier, the cache tiering agent migrates the data to the cache tier on read, then it is sent to the Ceph client. Thereafter, the Ceph client can perform I/O using the cache tier, until the data becomes inactive. This is ideal for mutable data (e.g., photo/video editing, transactional data, etc.).
  • Read-only Mode: When admins configure tiers with readonly mode, Ceph clients write data to the backing tier. On read, Ceph copies the requested object(s) from the backing tier to the cache tier. Stale objects get removed from the cache tier based on the defined policy. This approach is ideal for immutable data (e.g., presenting pictures/videos on a social network, DNA data, X-Ray imaging, etc.), because reading data from a cache pool that might contain out-of-date data provides weak consistency. Do not use readonly mode for mutable data.

Since all Ceph clients can use cache tiering, it has the potential to improve I/O performance for Ceph Block Devices, Ceph Object Storage, the Ceph Filesystem and native bindings.

Setting Up Pools

To set up cache tiering, you must have two pools. One will act as the backing storage and the other will act as the cache.

Setting Up a Backing Storage Pool

Setting up a backing storage pool typically involves one of two scenarios:

  • Standard Storage: In this scenario, the pool stores multiple copies of an object in the Ceph Storage Cluster.
  • Erasure Coding: In this scenario, the pool uses erasure coding to store data much more efficiently with a small performance tradeoff.

In the standard storage scenario, you can setup a CRUSH ruleset to establish the failure domain (e.g., osd, host, chassis, rack, row, etc.). Ceph OSD Daemons perform optimally when all storage drives in the ruleset are of the same size, speed (both RPMs and throughput) and type. See CRUSH Maps for details on creating a ruleset. Once you have created a ruleset, create a backing storage pool.

In the erasure coding scenario, the pool creation arguments will generate the appropriate ruleset automatically. See Create a Pool for details.

In subsequent examples, we will refer to the backing storage pool as cold-storage.

Setting Up a Cache Pool

Setting up a cache pool follows the same procedure as the standard storage scenario, but with this difference: the drives for the cache tier are typically high performance drives that reside in their own servers and have their own ruleset. When setting up a ruleset, it should take account of the hosts that have the high performance drives while omitting the hosts that don’t. See Placing Different Pools on Different OSDs for details.

In subsequent examples, we will refer to the cache pool as hot-storage and the backing pool as cold-storage.

For cache tier configuration and default values, see Pools - Set Pool Values.

Creating a Cache Tier

Setting up a cache tier involves associating a backing storage pool with a cache pool

ceph osd tier add {storagepool} {cachepool}

For example

ceph osd tier add cold-storage hot-storage

To set the cache mode, execute the following:

ceph osd tier cache-mode {cachepool} {cache-mode}

For example:

ceph osd tier cache-mode hot-storage writeback

Writeback cache tiers overlay the backing storage tier, so they require one additional step: you must direct all client traffic from the storage pool to the cache pool. To direct client traffic directly to the cache pool, execute the following:

ceph osd tier set-overlay {storagepool} {cachepool}

For example:

ceph osd tier set-overlay cold-storage hot-storage

Configuring a Cache Tier

Cache tiers have several configuration options. You may set cache tier configuration options with the following usage:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} {key} {value}

See Pools - Set Pool Values for details.

Target Size and Type

Ceph’s production cache tiers use a Bloom Filter for the hit_set_type:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} hit_set_type bloom

For example:

ceph osd pool set hot-storage hit_set_type bloom

The hit_set_count and hit_set_period define how much time each HitSet should cover, and how many such HitSets to store. Currently there is minimal benefit for hit_set_count > 1 since the agent does not yet act intelligently on that information.

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} hit_set_count 1
ceph osd pool set {cachepool} hit_set_period 3600
ceph osd pool set {cachepool} target_max_bytes 1000000000000

Binning accesses over time allows Ceph to determine whether a Ceph client accessed an object at least once, or more than once over a time period (“age” vs “temperature”).

Note

The longer the period and the higher the count, the more RAM the ceph-osd daemon consumes. In particular, when the agent is active to flush or evict cache objects, all hit_set_count HitSets are loaded into RAM.

Cache Sizing

The cache tiering agent performs two main functions:

  • Flushing: The agent identifies modified (or dirty) objects and forwards them to the storage pool for long-term storage.
  • Evicting: The agent identifies objects that haven’t been modified (or clean) and evicts the least recently used among them from the cache.

Relative Sizing

The cache tiering agent can flush or evict objects relative to the size of the cache pool. When the cache pool consists of a certain percentage of modified (or dirty) objects, the cache tiering agent will flush them to the storage pool. To set the cache_target_dirty_ratio, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} cache_target_dirty_ratio {0.0..1.0}

For example, setting the value to 0.4 will begin flushing modified (dirty) objects when they reach 40% of the cache pool’s capacity:

ceph osd pool set hot-storage cache_target_dirty_ratio 0.4

When the cache pool reaches a certain percentage of its capacity, the cache tiering agent will evict objects to maintain free capacity. To set the cache_target_full_ratio, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} cache_target_full_ratio {0.0..1.0}

For example, setting the value to 0.8 will begin flushing unmodified (clean) objects when they reach 80% of the cache pool’s capacity:

ceph osd pool set hot-storage cache_target_full_ratio 0.8

Absolute Sizing

The cache tiering agent can flush or evict objects based upon the total number of bytes or the total number of objects. To specify a maximum number of bytes, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} target_max_bytes {#bytes}

For example, to flush or evict at 1 TB, execute the following:

ceph osd pool hot-storage target_max_bytes 1000000000000

To specify the maximum number of objects, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} target_max_objects {#objects}

For example, to flush or evict at 1M objects, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set hot-storage target_max_objects 1000000

Note

If you specify both limits, the cache tiering agent will begin flushing or evicting when either threshold is triggered.

Cache Age

You can specify the minimum age of an object before the cache tiering agent flushes a recently modified (or dirty) object to the backing storage pool:

ceph osd pool set {cachepool} cache_min_flush_age {#seconds}

For example, to flush modified (or dirty) objects after 10 minutes, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set hot-storage cache_min_flush_age 600

You can specify the minimum age of an object before it will be evicted from the cache tier:

ceph osd pool {cache-tier} cache_min_evict_age {#seconds}

For example, to evict objects after 30 minutes, execute the following:

ceph osd pool set hot-storage cache_min_evict_age 1800

Removing a Cache Tier

Removing a cache tier differs depending on whether it is a writeback cache or a read-only cache.

Removing a Read-Only Cache

Since a read-only cache does not have modified data, you can disable and remove it without losing any recent changes to objects in the cache.

  1. Change the cache-mode to none to disable it.

    ceph osd tier cache-mode {cachepool} none

    For example:

    ceph osd tier cache-mode hot-storage none
  2. Remove the cache pool from the backing pool.

    ceph osd tier remove {storagepool} {cachepool}

    For example:

    ceph osd tier remove cold-storage hot-storage

Removing a Writeback Cache

Since a writeback cache may have modified data, you must take steps to ensure that you do not lose any recent changes to objects in the cache before you disable and remove it.

  1. Change the cache mode to forward so that new and modified objects will flush to the backing storage pool.

    ceph osd tier cache-mode {cachepool} forward

    For example:

    ceph osd tier cache-mode hot-storage forward
  2. Ensure that the cache pool has been flushed. This may take a few minutes:

    rados -p {cachepool} ls

    If the cache pool still has objects, you can flush them manually. For example:

    rados -p {cachepool} cache-flush-evict-all
  3. Remove the overlay so that clients will not direct traffic to the cache.

    ceph osd tier remove-overlay {storagetier}

    For example:

    ceph osd tier remove-overlay cold-storage
  4. Finally, remove the cache tier pool from the backing storage pool.

    ceph osd tier remove {storagepool} {cachepool}

    For example:

    ceph osd tier remove cold-storage hot-storage