Bucket Notifications

New in version Nautilus.

Bucket notifications provide a mechanism for sending information out of radosgw when certain events happen on the bucket. Notifications can be sent to HTTP endpoints, AMQP0.9.1 endpoints, and Kafka endpoints.

The PubSub Module (and not the bucket-notification mechanism) should be used for events stored in Ceph.

A user can create topics. A topic entity is defined by its name and is “per tenant”. A user can associate its topics (via notification configuration) only with buckets it owns.

A notification entity must be created in order to send event notifications for a specific bucket. A notification entity can be created either for a subset of event types or for all event types (which is the default). The notification may also filter out events based on matches of the prefixes and suffixes of (1) the keys, (2) the metadata attributes attached to the object, or (3) the object tags. Regular-expression matching can also be used on these to create filters. There can be multiple notifications for any specific topic, and the same topic can used for multiple notifications.

REST API has been defined so as to provide configuration and control interfaces for the bucket notification mechanism. This API is similar to the one defined as the S3-compatible API of the PubSub Module.

Note

To enable bucket notifications API, the rgw_enable_apis configuration parameter should contain: “notifications”.

Notification Reliability

Notifications can be sent synchronously or asynchronously. This section describes the latency and reliability that you should expect for synchronous and asynchronous notifications.

Synchronous Notifications

Notifications can be sent synchronously, as part of the operation that triggered them. In this mode, the operation is acknowledged (acked) only after the notification is sent to the topic’s configured endpoint. This means that the round trip time of the notification (the time it takes to send the notification to the topic’s endpoint plus the time it takes to receive the acknowledgement) is added to the latency of the operation itself.

Note

The original triggering operation is considered successful even if the notification fails with an error, cannot be delivered, or times out.

Asynchronous Notifications

Notifications can be sent asynchronously. They are committed into persistent storage and then asynchronously sent to the topic’s configured endpoint. In this case, the only latency added to the original operation is the latency added when the notification is committed to persistent storage.

Note

If the notification fails with an error, cannot be delivered, or times out, it is retried until it is successfully acknowledged.

Tip

To minimize the latency added by asynchronous notification, we recommended placing the “log” pool on fast media.

Topic Management via CLI

Configuration of all topics, associated with a tenant, could be fetched using the following command:

radosgw-admin topic list [--tenant={tenant}]

Configuration of a specific topic could be fetched using:

radosgw-admin topic get --topic={topic-name} [--tenant={tenant}]

And removed using:

radosgw-admin topic rm --topic={topic-name} [--tenant={tenant}]

Notification Performance Stats

The same counters are shared between the pubsub sync module and the bucket notification mechanism.

  • pubsub_event_triggered: running counter of events with at least one topic associated with them

  • pubsub_event_lost: running counter of events that had topics associated with them but that were not pushed to any of the endpoints

  • pubsub_push_ok: running counter, for all notifications, of events successfully pushed to their endpoint

  • pubsub_push_fail: running counter, for all notifications, of events failed to be pushed to their endpoint

  • pubsub_push_pending: gauge value of events pushed to an endpoint but not acked or nacked yet

Note

pubsub_event_triggered and pubsub_event_lost are incremented per event, while: pubsub_push_ok, pubsub_push_fail, are incremented per push action on each notification

Bucket Notification REST API

Topics

Note

In all topic actions, the parameters are URL-encoded and sent in the message body using this content type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded.

Create a Topic

This creates a new topic. Provide the topic with push endpoint parameters, which will be used later when a notification is created. A response is generated. A successful response includes the the topic’s ARN (the “Amazon Resource Name”, a unique identifier used to reference the topic). To update a topic, use the same command that you used to create it (but when updating, use the name of an existing topic and different endpoint values).

Tip

Any notification already associated with the topic must be re-created in order for the topic to update.

Note

For rabbitmq, push-endpoint (with a hyphen in the middle) must be changed to push_endpoint (with an underscore in the middle).

POST

Action=CreateTopic
&Name=<topic-name>
[&Attributes.entry.1.key=amqp-exchange&Attributes.entry.1.value=<exchange>]
[&Attributes.entry.2.key=amqp-ack-level&Attributes.entry.2.value=none|broker|routable]
[&Attributes.entry.3.key=verify-ssl&Attributes.entry.3.value=true|false]
[&Attributes.entry.4.key=kafka-ack-level&Attributes.entry.4.value=none|broker]
[&Attributes.entry.5.key=use-ssl&Attributes.entry.5.value=true|false]
[&Attributes.entry.6.key=ca-location&Attributes.entry.6.value=<file path>]
[&Attributes.entry.7.key=OpaqueData&Attributes.entry.7.value=<opaque data>]
[&Attributes.entry.8.key=push-endpoint&Attributes.entry.8.value=<endpoint>]
[&Attributes.entry.9.key=persistent&Attributes.entry.9.value=true|false]
[&Attributes.entry.10.key=cloudevents&Attributes.entry.10.value=true|false]

Request parameters:

  • push-endpoint: This is the URI of an endpoint to send push notifications to.

  • OpaqueData: Opaque data is set in the topic configuration and added to all notifications that are triggered by the topic.

  • persistent: This indicates whether notifications to this endpoint are persistent (=asynchronous) or not persistent. (This is “false” by default.)

  • HTTP endpoint

  • URI: http[s]://<fqdn>[:<port]

  • port: This defaults to 80 for HTTP and 443 for HTTPS.

  • verify-ssl: This indicates whether the server certificate is validated by the client. (This is “true” by default.)

  • cloudevents: This indicates whether the HTTP header should contain attributes according to the S3 CloudEvents Spec. (This is “false” by default.)

  • AMQP0.9.1 endpoint

  • URI: amqp[s]://[<user>:<password>@]<fqdn>[:<port>][/<vhost>]

  • user/password: This defaults to “guest/guest”.

  • user/password: This must be provided only over HTTPS. Topic creation requests will otherwise be rejected.

  • port: This defaults to 5672 for unencrypted connections and 5671 for SSL-encrypted connections.

  • vhost: This defaults to “/”.

  • verify-ssl: This indicates whether the server certificate is validated by the client. (This is “true” by default.)

  • If ca-location is provided and a secure connection is used, the specified CA will be used to authenticate the broker. The default CA will not be used.

  • amqp-exchange: The exchanges must exist and must be able to route messages based on topics. This parameter is mandatory. Different topics that point to the same endpoint must use the same exchange.

  • amqp-ack-level: No end2end acking is required. Messages may persist in the broker before being delivered to their final destinations. Three ack methods exist:

  • “none”: The message is considered “delivered” if it is sent to the broker.

  • “broker”: The message is considered “delivered” if it is acked by the broker (default).

  • “routable”: The message is considered “delivered” if the broker can route to a consumer.

Tip

The topic-name (see Create a Topic) is used for the AMQP topic (“routing key” for a topic exchange).

  • Kafka endpoint

  • URI: kafka://[<user>:<password>@]<fqdn>[:<port]

  • use-ssl: If this is set to “true”, a secure connection is used to connect to the broker. (This is “false” by default.)

  • ca-location: If this is provided and a secure connection is used, the specified CA will be used insted of the default CA to authenticate the broker.

  • user/password: This must be provided only over HTTPS. Topic creation requests will otherwise be rejected.

  • user/password: This must be provided along with use-ssl. Connections to the broker will otherwise fail.

  • port: This defaults to 9092.

  • kafka-ack-level: No end2end acking is required. Messages may persist in the broker before being delivered to their final destinations. Two ack methods exist:

  • “none”: Messages are considered “delivered” if sent to the broker.

  • “broker”: Messages are considered “delivered” if acked by the broker. (This is the default.)

Note

  • The key-value pair of a specific parameter need not reside in the same line as the parameter, and need not appear in any specific order, but it must use the same index.

  • Attribute indexing need not be sequential and need not start from any specific value.

  • AWS Create Topic provides a detailed explanation of the endpoint attributes format. In our case, however, different keys and values are used.

The response has the following format:

<CreateTopicResponse xmlns="https://sns.amazonaws.com/doc/2010-03-31/">
    <CreateTopicResult>
        <TopicArn></TopicArn>
    </CreateTopicResult>
    <ResponseMetadata>
        <RequestId></RequestId>
    </ResponseMetadata>
</CreateTopicResponse>

The topic ARN in the response has the following format:

arn:aws:sns:<zone-group>:<tenant>:<topic>

Get Topic Attributes

This returns information about a specific topic. This includes push-endpoint information, if provided.

POST

Action=GetTopicAttributes
&TopicArn=<topic-arn>

The response has the following format:

<GetTopicAttributesResponse>
    <GetTopicAttributesResult>
        <Attributes>
            <entry>
                <key>User</key>
                <value></value>
            </entry>
            <entry>
                <key>Name</key>
                <value></value>
            </entry>
            <entry>
                <key>EndPoint</key>
                <value></value>
            </entry>
            <entry>
                <key>TopicArn</key>
                <value></value>
            </entry>
            <entry>
                <key>OpaqueData</key>
                <value></value>
            </entry>
        </Attributes>
    </GetTopicAttributesResult>
    <ResponseMetadata>
        <RequestId></RequestId>
    </ResponseMetadata>
</GetTopicAttributesResponse>
  • User: the name of the user that created the topic.

  • Name: the name of the topic.

  • EndPoint: The JSON-formatted endpoint parameters, including:
    • EndpointAddress: The push-endpoint URL.

    • EndpointArgs: The push-endpoint args.

    • EndpointTopic: The topic name to be sent to the endpoint (can be different than the above topic name).

    • HasStoredSecret: This is “true” if the endpoint URL contains user/password information. In this case, the request must be made over HTTPS. The “topic get” request will otherwise be rejected.

    • Persistent: This is “true” if the topic is persistent.

  • TopicArn: topic ARN.

  • OpaqueData: The opaque data set on the topic.

Get Topic Information

This returns information about a specific topic. This includes push-endpoint information, if provided. Note that this API is now deprecated in favor of the AWS compliant GetTopicAttributes API.

POST

Action=GetTopic
&TopicArn=<topic-arn>

The response has the following format:

<GetTopicResponse>
    <GetTopicResult>
        <Topic>
            <User></User>
            <Name></Name>
            <EndPoint>
                <EndpointAddress></EndpointAddress>
                <EndpointArgs></EndpointArgs>
                <EndpointTopic></EndpointTopic>
                <HasStoredSecret></HasStoredSecret>
                <Persistent></Persistent>
            </EndPoint>
            <TopicArn></TopicArn>
            <OpaqueData></OpaqueData>
        </Topic>
    </GetTopicResult>
    <ResponseMetadata>
        <RequestId></RequestId>
    </ResponseMetadata>
</GetTopicResponse>
  • User: The name of the user that created the topic.

  • Name: The name of the topic.

  • EndpointAddress: The push-endpoint URL.

  • EndpointArgs: The push-endpoint args.

  • EndpointTopic: The topic name to be sent to the endpoint (which can be different than the above topic name).

  • HasStoredSecret: This is “true” if the endpoint URL contains user/password information. In this case, the request must be made over HTTPS. The “topic get” request will otherwise be rejected.

  • Persistent: “true” if topic is persistent.

  • TopicArn: topic ARN.

  • OpaqueData: the opaque data set on the topic.

Delete Topic

POST

Action=DeleteTopic
&TopicArn=<topic-arn>

This deletes the specified topic.

Note

  • Deleting an unknown notification (for example, double delete) is not considered an error.

  • Deleting a topic does not automatically delete all notifications associated with it.

The response has the following format:

<DeleteTopicResponse xmlns="https://sns.amazonaws.com/doc/2010-03-31/">
    <ResponseMetadata>
        <RequestId></RequestId>
    </ResponseMetadata>
</DeleteTopicResponse>

List Topics

List all topics associated with a tenant.

POST

Action=ListTopics

The response has the following format:

<ListTopicsResponse xmlns="https://sns.amazonaws.com/doc/2010-03-31/">
    <ListTopicsResult>
        <Topics>
            <member>
                <User></User>
                <Name></Name>
                <EndPoint>
                    <EndpointAddress></EndpointAddress>
                    <EndpointArgs></EndpointArgs>
                    <EndpointTopic></EndpointTopic>
                </EndPoint>
                <TopicArn></TopicArn>
                <OpaqueData></OpaqueData>
            </member>
        </Topics>
    </ListTopicsResult>
    <ResponseMetadata>
        <RequestId></RequestId>
    </ResponseMetadata>
</ListTopicsResponse>
  • If the endpoint URL contains user/password information in any part of the topic, the request must be made over HTTPS. The “topic list” request will otherwise be rejected.

Notifications

Detailed under: Bucket Operations.

Note

  • “Abort Multipart Upload” request does not emit a notification

  • Both “Initiate Multipart Upload” and “POST Object” requests will emit an s3:ObjectCreated:Post notification

Events

Events are in JSON format (regardless of the actual endpoint), and share the same structure as S3-compatible events that are pushed or pulled using the pubsub sync module. For example:

{"Records":[
    {
        "eventVersion":"2.1",
        "eventSource":"ceph:s3",
        "awsRegion":"us-east-1",
        "eventTime":"2019-11-22T13:47:35.124724Z",
        "eventName":"ObjectCreated:Put",
        "userIdentity":{
            "principalId":"tester"
        },
        "requestParameters":{
            "sourceIPAddress":""
        },
        "responseElements":{
            "x-amz-request-id":"503a4c37-85eb-47cd-8681-2817e80b4281.5330.903595",
            "x-amz-id-2":"14d2-zone1-zonegroup1"
        },
        "s3":{
            "s3SchemaVersion":"1.0",
            "configurationId":"mynotif1",
            "bucket":{
                "name":"mybucket1",
                "ownerIdentity":{
                    "principalId":"tester"
                },
                "arn":"arn:aws:s3:us-east-1::mybucket1",
                "id":"503a4c37-85eb-47cd-8681-2817e80b4281.5332.38"
            },
            "object":{
                "key":"myimage1.jpg",
                "size":"1024",
                "eTag":"37b51d194a7513e45b56f6524f2d51f2",
                "versionId":"",
                "sequencer": "F7E6D75DC742D108",
                "metadata":[],
                "tags":[]
            }
        },
        "eventId":"",
        "opaqueData":"me@example.com"
    }
]}
  • awsRegion: The zonegroup.

  • eventTime: The timestamp, indicating when the event was triggered.

  • eventName: For the list of supported events see: S3 Notification Compatibility. Note that eventName values do not start with the s3: prefix.

  • userIdentity.principalId: The user that triggered the change.

  • requestParameters.sourceIPAddress: not supported

  • responseElements.x-amz-request-id: The request ID of the original change.

  • responseElements.x_amz_id_2: The RGW on which the change was made.

  • s3.configurationId: The notification ID that created the event.

  • s3.bucket.name: The name of the bucket.

  • s3.bucket.ownerIdentity.principalId: The owner of the bucket.

  • s3.bucket.arn: The ARN of the bucket.

  • s3.bucket.id: The ID of the bucket. (This is an extension to the S3 notification API.)

  • s3.object.key: The object key.

  • s3.object.size: The object size.

  • s3.object.eTag: The object etag.

  • s3.object.versionId: The object version, if the bucket is versioned. When a copy is made, it includes the version of the target object. When a delete marker is created, it includes the version of the delete marker.

  • s3.object.sequencer: The monotonically-increasing identifier of the “change per object” (hexadecimal format).

  • s3.object.metadata: Any metadata set on the object that is sent as x-amz-meta- (that is, any metadata set on the object that is sent as an extension to the S3 notification API).

  • s3.object.tags: Any tags set on the object. (This is an extension to the S3 notification API.)

  • s3.eventId: The unique ID of the event, which could be used for acking. (This is an extension to the S3 notification API.)

  • s3.opaqueData: This means that “opaque data” is set in the topic configuration and is added to all notifications triggered by the topic. (This is an extension to the S3 notification API.)